Sawakin Marine Research Station

About us

The station was home to many Red Sea explorers like Peter Vine, Hagen Schmid, Johanned H. D. Scroeder, Masteler, Randal and Bishop plus others.

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Research

The Sudanese Red Sea coast extends in about 720 square meters. It extends from the semi-desert regions to the tropics and is characterized by the presence of marvelous coral reefs, islands and archepelagoes.

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Contact us

The station is a research and universities restricted area and can only be requested for marine biology research perposes. It is managed by the Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum.

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Some of the amazing world under the water

There is plethora of rare and fascinating organisms in the Sudanese Red Sea shore

Whale Sharks

Whale sharks (Rhyncodon typus) are slow-moving, filter-feeding carpet sharks and the largest known extant fish species. They are found in open waters of the tropical oceans and is rarely found in water below 21 °C (70 °F). The Sudanese Red Sea is among the regions where you can find this species.

Manta Ray

The giant oceanic manta ray, giant manta ray, or oceanic manta ray (Mobula birostris) is  the largest type of ray in the world. It is circumglobal and is typically found in tropical and subtropical waters, but can also be found in temperate waters. It is present in the Red Sea.

Crown-of-thorns Starfish

One of the largest starfish in the world, Acanthaster planciiplancii has a very wide Indo-Pacific distribution. The crown-of-thorns starfish, , is a large starfish that preys upon hard, or stony, coral polyps (Scleractinia). The crown-of-thorns starfish receives its name from venomous thorn-like spines that cover its upper surface, resembling the biblical crown of thorns. It is found around Australia and at tropical and subtropical latitudes from the Red Sea and the East African coast across the Indian Ocean, and across the Pacific Ocean to the west coast of Central America. It occurs where coral reefs or hard coral communities occur in the region.

Xenia elongata

Xenia is a genus of photosynthetic soft marine coral in the family Xeniidae. They resemble a mushroom, with "arms" coming out from the top that end in many-fingered "hands". It is unique among corals because of its ability to use its "hands" to "pulse" or push water away from the colony in a constant, grabbing motion. Common names include fast-pulse Xenia. Species of Xenia are sometimes referred to as pulse corals.

Chelonia mydas

The green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) is the only species in the genus Chelonia. Its range extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and it is also found in the Indian Ocean

Avicennia marina

Avicennia marina aka the grey mangrove or white mangrove, is a species of mangrove tree (Family Acanthaceae). It is an important nurseru system for several organisms.

Mangroves are one of the most important parts of the coastal habitat,  which occur in patches along the intertidal zone. Mangroves play a vital  role in the health of the marine ecosystem, because they filter and  block sediments from the unstable substrates of the wadi and desert, and  preventing siltation of sea grass beds and coral reefs. Seagrasses  are vitally important coastal habitats that are more productive than  agricultural land and they are closely linked to coral reefs. They  stabilize sediments, trap nutrients for recycling, and serve as a  nursery for many species of crustaceans and fishes. Turtles, sea cows,  mollusces and fishes feed directly on seagrass. In this webinar  we will introduce you to both ecosystems, their functions, adaptations, role  in ecology, threats and how you can contribute in their conservation.

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Xenia Elongata is a photograph by Puzzles Shum which was uploaded on August 9th, 2012.
Chelonia mydas
 Avicennia marina
 Avicennia marina

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